What's Happening on the Farm?

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Posted 3/14/2017 8:42pm by Sally Voris .

Global Sisterhood Gathering, Monday, March 27, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

"Profound and uplifting," were the words one woman used to describe last month's gathering of a circle of the Global Sisterhood (sister.unify.org). The group is calling for a movement of soulful women around the world focused on transforming themselves and the world to create harmony and health for all. They are asking women to meet at every new moon to embody transformative leadership. 

This month, Christine Pilson will facilitate our circle. Christine is a Certified Health Coach. She writes, "I believe that food is medicine, and is the foundation of a healthy body and sharp mind. There’s no greater joy than having the energy to do the things you love and to be with the people who love and support you." 

The event will be held at the Retreat House, 4234 Ruggles Road, Taneytown. It is free, though we are taking donations to support refugee women throughout the world. RSVP here as space is limited. 

Thanks and hope to see you soon! 


Sally Voris, White Rose Farm

www.whiterosefarm.com, 410-756-9303

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted 3/12/2017 10:06am by Sally Voris .

We are holding a Prayer Ribbon workshop today, (Sunday, March 12) from 1:30 to 5:00 p.m. at 4234 Ruggles Road, Taneytown. We will host an informal gathering and farm food afterward. Native American Evan Pritchard will combine story, ritual, song, flute, and drum to lead people into a deep expression of prayers for healing. The event will be held partly inside, partly outdoors. We still have some space available. To register, click here.  For a flyer, click here .    

Posted 3/11/2017 10:18am by Sally Voris .

Native American Evan Pritchard combined story, ritual, song, flute, and drum to lead people into a deep expression of prayers for healing in Baltimore on Friday, March 10. We will lead a workshop here at the farm today from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. There is still some room for people to join us. Click here to register. 

I have talked with Evan. We have agreed to offer the workshop again this Sunday, that if at least 8 people sign up. We will lead the workshop from 1:30 to 4:30 with a ceremony at 4:30 and then simple farm food. 

It is a full moon on Sunday and there is a place on the property where one can watch sunset and moonrise (which will occur between 7:15 and 7:30 p.m.) We invite those who can to stay for that event and then we will close for the evening. 
 
Most of the event will be inside in a  warm house, and we will be briefly outside for parts of the workshop/ceremony. 
 
Please RSVP here if you can come. And please invite others if you feel so moved. Click here for a flyer (information is the same, except for the change in date.) Thanks 
 
To harmony and healing for ourselves, for our nation and for the world! 

 Sally Voris, White Rose Farm

www.whiterosefarm.com, 410-756-9303

Posted 3/9/2017 7:35am by Sally Voris .

Harmony & Healing with Prayer Ribbons

Saturday, March 11, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.

White Rose Farm, 4234 Ruggles Road, Taneytown, MD 21787, 410-756-9303, www.whiterosefarm.com. Sponsored by White Rose Farm Circle, Inc. Space is limited. RSVP by clicking here.  Download a flyer.  

1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Workshop: Harmony and Healing with Prayer Ribbons. Native American Evan Pritchard will introduce the Algonquin tradition of prayer ribbons and set the context for how the prayer ribbons speak to finding harmony in diversity in America. He will share the meaning of the ribbons and how they are used; participants will make and tie their own ribbons.

From 4:30 p.m. To 5:30 p.m, Evan Pritchard and Sally Voris will lead a ceremony with the ribbons to connect with the spirits of the land and the spirit of unity in diversity. Following the ceremony, White Rose Farm will host a fire circle and offer simple farm food. Participants are encouraged to bring their drums or musical instruments. We will feast, sing, dance and drum. Cash donations will be accepted for the food.

Sunday, March 12―Evan is available to lead a workshop/ event, (If the event fills on Saturday, we will lead an additional workshop on Sunday.) 

May we come together in harmony and peace. 

Sally Voris, White Rose Farm

www.whiterosefarm.com, 410-756-9303

Posted 3/7/2017 12:53pm by Sally Voris .

Wednesday, March 8, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

The Global Sisterhood is organizing a special gathering for International Women's Day. Circles of soulful women all over the world will gather with the focused intention of transforming ourselves and our world to promote happiness and health for all.  Our circle will be held at the Retreat House, 4234 Ruggles Road, Taneytown, MD, 21787. 

Takoa Robinson will facilitate this circle. Takoa is an M.Div. candidate at Lancaster Theological Seminary. In addition to her work as a student, she is a mother of two middle school aged children, with whom she enjoys celebrating the silly side of life.  She and her husband, take their little cockapoo, Ollie, for daily walks as a reminder that bodies need movement and fresh perspectives to live.

Her love of music reminds her to sing out, cry out, shout out in transparent honesty the prayers of lament, hope, and joy that well up in the gut of each of us as we learn what it means to let go and dance, even in the darkness.  

The event is free, but space is limited. Please register here. We will take a donation to support women refugees as part of the initiative of the Global Sisterhood. Visit www.sister.unify.org for more about this initiative or about the Global Sisterhood. 

May we support health and happiness for all peoples! 

Sally Voris, White Rose Farm

www.whiterosefarm.com, 410-756-9303

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted 3/2/2017 10:22am by Sally Voris .

Three airbnb guests, all young women, graduate students in Washington DC, came for a one-night retreat in the country in mid-February. The weather was unseasonably warm; the sky cloudless. They were open, friendly, and clearly adventurous.

I welcomed them and showed them the house. They spoke to each other in a foreign language. What language are you speaking?, I asked inquiringly. Arabic, the leader responded. Two of them were from Pakistan, one was from Egypt. When I showed her how to light the fire I had set in the fireplace insert, I casually mentioned that they were welcome to make a fire in the fire circle in the back yard using wood next to the fireplace. “Call me if you need me,” I said as I left them.

The next morning, I invited them to work with me in the garden. They were delighted! I walked to the Retreat House with my border collie. Two stepped back immediately as the dog approached. The Egyptian native explained that she had never seen dogs running free. I took her arm reassuringly, as we walked across the property. I threw one stick after another to my dog. They had grown up in large cities and had little experience being in the country. They had finally watched a you-tube video to get the campfire started. Then they sat by the fire and looked at the stars. It was an amazing night!

Now they were eager for a farm experience. They fed a handful of grain to my two Jersey cows. I gave them a brief tour of the garden before starting to work. They had on casual city clothes; one wore white knit boots. She asked if she could borrow work shoes. I said yes. We went to the farmhouse.

One of the Pakistani women sighed deeply as she saw my cat. She scrolled images on her smart phone to show me her short-haired gray cat. I handed my cat to her. She held him close. I remembered how much it meant to me when, as a college student far from home, I was invited into local homes for a family meal. I sensed how these women savored sounds, smells and touches reminding them of home.

Meantime, I considered what job I could give them. Clearly, no mud or muck was appropriate. I thought of weeding the rose bed, but they could not discriminate weed from flower. I saw the row of seven clumps of six-foot-high ornamental grass. Each spring, I struggled to cut the woody stems of the grass in the 25-foot row. My wrists tired from the pressure I needed to exert to cut each stem.

I showed them the grass and asked if they could do it. They tackled the work with the easy rhythm, strength and energy of youth. I worked close by. They spoke to each other in English and Arabic. They could have been women from another time, another place: the cadence of their speech and the rhythm of their work seemed so universal. They began singing a lilting song, a children's song about milk from a cow, they shared. They smiled and nodded toward barn where they had touched cows moments earlier. Their voices, melodious and soft, were a lullaby for my heart, for the land and for the Earth herself.

I imagined my land hearing their song, feeling their touch and and sending a message to their mother land.”Your daughters are here! They are touching the Earth and singing. They are happy and healthy; their spirits are soaring!” It is just what every mother wants to know! Years ago, a friend had suggested that I imagine farming as skin care for the mother, as massage, as touching and being touched.

They finished their work and went to lunch, planning to return to garden in the afternoon. Instead, they packed their things and returned to the city. We had shared a deep moment, touching each other and the Earth. What could be more real, more simple and more filling? May we find more ways to touch each other's hearts and the heart of the Earth. 

 

 

 

Posted 2/27/2017 8:48pm by Sally Voris .

White Rose Farm Circle, Inc. is supporting prayer ribbon events in Baltimore and at White Rose Farm on March 10 and 11. What are prayer ribbons? They are an Algonquin tradition and they speak to unity in diversity. Here is the schedule: 

Friday, March 10, 2017: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. Cylburn Arboretum: 4915 Greenspring Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21209, 410-367-2217, www.cylburn.org. Prayer Ribbon Ceremony with Evan Pritchard. High on a hill above the Jones Falls, in the trees and gardens of Cylburn Arboretum, Native American Evan Pritchard will introduce the Algonquin tradition of prayer ribbons. He and Sally Voris will lead a simple and meaningful ceremony with the ribbons, honoring the Native culture and the spirits of the land. The event will be held in the mansion and on the grounds. Cost is free, though a donation of $5.00 is requested for supplies. Each person will make and take home a prayer ribbon. Please register by contacting Megan at Cylburn Arboretum.

Friday, March 10, 2017, 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. Ruscombe Community Health Center, 4803 Yellowwood Road, Baltimore, Md 21229, 410-367-7300, www.ruscombe.org. I Love Diversity!: Prayer Ribbon Ceremony. with Evan Pritchard and Sally Voris. Native American Evan Pritchard will introduce the Algonquin tradition of prayer ribbons and set the context for how the prayer ribbons speak to finding harmony in diversity in America. He and Sally Voris will lead a simple and meaningful ceremony with the ribbons, honoring the Native culture, the spirits of the land, and the spirit of unity in diversity. Weather permitting, the event will be held near a lovely, small pond; it will be held in the yoga studio at the Community Hall, if need be. The event is free, and donations are encouraged. Please register by contacting Helen at Ruscombe Mansion.

Saturday, March 11, 2017: White Rose Farm, 4234 Ruggles Road, Taneytown, MD 21787, 410-756-9303, www.whiterosefarm.com. Sponsored by White Rose Farm Circle, Inc. Space is limited. RSVP by clicking here.  Download a flyer.  

1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Workshop: Harmony and Healing with Prayer Ribbons. Native American Evan Pritchard will introduce the Algonquin tradition of prayer ribbons and set the context for how the prayer ribbons speak to finding harmony in diversity in America. He will share the meaning of the ribbons and how they are used; participants will make and tie their own ribbons.

From 4:30 p.m. To 5:30 p.m, Evan Pritchard and Sally Voris will lead a ceremony with the ribbons to connect with the spirits of the land and the spirit of unity in diversity.

From 5:30 to 9:00 p.m., White Rose Farm will host a fire circle and offer simple farm food. Participants are encouraged to bring their drums or musical instruments. We will feast, sing, dance and drum. Cash donations will be accepted for the food.

Sunday, March 12―Evan is available to lead a workshop/ event, (If the event fills on Saturday, we will lead an additional workshop on Sunday.) 

May we come together in harmony and peace. 

Sally Voris, White Rose Farm

www.whiterosefarm.com, 410-756-9303

Posted 2/21/2017 6:35pm by Sally Voris .


Our next Global Sisterhood circle is scheduled for Sunday, February 26 from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Retreat House, 4234 Ruggles Road, Taneytown, MD 21787. Yoga Instructor  and workshop leader Shawn Essed will facilitate the program.

 

This new moon creates a solar eclipse, an especially powerful time of change. The stars signal hope for a brighter future, especially if use our God-given talents to turn our dreams into reality. In our gathering, we will explore our God-given talents and share our dreams for the future as we as soulful women transform ourselves and the world. 

The event is free. We ask that you register ahead(here), as space is limited. 

Sally Voris, White Rose Farm

www.whiterosefarm.com, 410-756-9303

Posted 2/17/2017 8:18pm by Sally Voris .

Prayer Ribbon Workshop

Saturday, March 11 from 1:30 to 5:30, with a fire circle and shared meal afterwards, held at the Retreat House, 4234 Ruggles Road, Taneytown. MD. 

Native American Evan Pritchard is coming to White Rose Farm to lead a workshop and ceremony about prayer ribbons. In this Algonquin tradition, the ribbons—yellow, red, black and white--represent the four original races of man; the green, Mother Earth; the blue, Father Sky. When we tie them together and display them publicly, we affirm that we choose to honor and respect each other, the natural world, and the Spirit that guides us. What a potent symbol at this time!

White Rose Farm Circle, Inc. has agreed to sponsor the event. Evan confirmed that a prayer ribbon ceremony can get subtle energies moving again. It wordlessly conveys a message of harmony with nature and each other. The bright colors speak to our hearts and to the elemental forces in Nature herself. As the ribbons dance in the breeze, they remind us to move with the wind of the Spirit, to open to new energies and forms. They also honor the spirits of the land. 

Cost: $40/adult, $60/couple or parent/child; $75/family.  Click here to register. 

Following the workshop, we will create a ceremony to promote harmony with the land, its spirits and our communities. A fire circle and simple farm food will be offered after the ceremony. Bring a drum or musical instrument and plan to feast, dance, drum and sing! 

Sally Voris, White Rose Farm

www.whiterosefarm.com, 410-756-9303

Posted 2/15/2017 11:41am by Sally Voris .

“ There is a war playing out now...the treasure being fought over is the human soul.” Susan Raven

I read this quote in Nature Spirits, The Remembrance as I drifted off to sleep under a wool blanket close to the wood stove in my drafty old farmhouse. I especially appreciated these simple pleasures after spending three days helping a friend staff a booth at a large farm conference.

She offered me the second bed in her room at the conference center. I woke the first morning feeling edgy. Had the foam mattress and the light synthetic comforter disturbed my energy field? I worked at the booth all day, got little fresh air and no direct sunlight. Then I walked across asphalt to my car. The second night, I shuddered just sitting on the bed, so I slept on two chairs and an ottoman.

In her book, Raven asserts that we strain our immune systems without the connection to the Earth and her “negatively-charged, health-bearing ions.” She writes, “ the emotional feedback from military conflict, fundamentalist religion, manipulative media and corporate malpractice hover over us like menacing storm clouds.” We will experience “ever more sophisticated modes of incursion into our daily lives,” she writes, until we wake up to the power of “our own subtle, supersensible bodies.”

Stated simply, it's time to dance our soul's dance. Where do we start? We have created structures all around us that are convenient, comfortable and soul-deadening. We gathered as sustainable farmers to share our ideas, practices and presence with each other. We are among the most conscious stewards of land in America. Yet we spent our time indoors in rooms with stale air, man-made materials and electronic equipment. We shared how to grow food in a place which damaged the environment and sapped our vitality. The deeper truth-- that connecting to Nature and to each other feeds us as nothing else can—remained unexpressed and unacknowledged. We were disconnected from life itself!

On Friday evening, we watched a movie, “How to Let Go of the World and Love All the Things that Climate Can't Change.” I felt overwhelmed by the environmental degradation and destruction it showed. I was buoyed by the stories of leaders who were using their “moral imaginations” to engage and create a better world. The movie juxtaposed different cultures. Native peoples from an island in the Pacific bravely paddled hand-made canoes in front of a giant freighter to protest its hauling coal to China. Residents in Peking wore face masks to breathe in its polluted air. How do we make good choices when so much around us sets the frame in which we live? Change the focus: create the future from your own inner knowing, rather than unconsciously accepting what the outside presents to you.

When I first came to the farm, the spirit of my father and grandmother called to me, “Assume you have enough. Assume everything you need will be provided.” I stepped into each day imagining that I had been given a chance to create a place of beauty, bounty and balance. I met joy, sorrow, delight, disgust, life, death, the profound, the ephemeral, the plebeian. I was tested, but finally, I simply began dancing with whatever the day presented, knowing it would feed me deeply.

The leader on the Pacific island chose to act not just for himself, but to honor his ancestors and his entire culture. He cried when he saw that the place where his father had been laid to rest had been washed away. Then he lifted himself and joyfully greeted another day.

Surely if he can face each day courageously with the imminent threat of his island disappearing, we can reclaim ourselves, our souls, our lives and our land to create and sustain life--not just for ourselves--but for others, for future generations, and for life itself.

It is how my soul wants to dance. Will you join me?

 

Global Sisterhood Gathering

The farm will host a gathering as part of the Global Sisterhood, a world-wide movement empowering soulful women to embody leadership to promote peace and harmony on Monday, August 21 starting at 7:30 p.m. The event is free and we ask you to register here.  

Support the Circle!

White Rose Farm Circle, Inc. fosters community to empower people to work together to restore health to the land, the natural world and each other. Learn more about membership and/or donate to support our 501-c-3 non-profit organization. 

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